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I thought I would just attach these pisc and let someone else explain to me what's going on.... I started with a 100% (not 80) full charge. No racing - just daily driver around S CA - The % doesn't equal the miles remaining at all. Based on % iI'll get 209 total miles. Not the 313 shown.
 

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I thought I would just attach these pisc and let someone else explain to me what's going on.... I started with a 100% (not 80) full charge. No racing - just daily driver around S CA - The % doesn't equal the miles remaining at all. Based on % iI'll get 209 total miles. Not the 313 shown.
@vetteman It just now occurred to me that nobody has actually answered you. In any EV the displayed range number is an estimate the car computes using past driving history and various other factors. Each OEM has their own formula for calculating remaining range and in truth, it's just a guess to be taken with a hearty dose of salt. It is the remaining capacity and usage per mile that really count.

The number that jumps off your display to me is the 2.0 miles per killowatt hour that your car is showing. That is much higher lower than I would expect for this car in normal use. Everybody's "normal" is different but that is definitely high energy consumption. There are several use cases that could lead to that and there is the possibility of a flaw with the car. If your previous gas car got mileage similarly below its EPA numbers that could be a clue. If not I'm sure Lucid service people could run a diagnostic test to check for a flaw.

Things that drain range:
High speed- wind resistance increases at a hyperbolic rate. This is the #1 range killer for most drivers.
Extended stop and go driving- It can't be avoided but driving smoothly helps.
Climate control- Air conditioning and heating both consume a lot of power. This especially can impact range if the car spends long periods idling or in slow traffic with the climate control set to a very different temperature from outside.
Tires- Low tire pressure or non-stock tires/wheels can have a surprising impact on range, but is unlikely in your case.

If I had 2.0 mi/kwh in this car in my normal 100 degree summer Texas commute with the A/C set at 72 I would assume that something was wrong with the car. If I had the same consumption after zooming my favorite twisty road in, um, Mexico I would think it was just fine.
 

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Driven just 647 miles so far, I seem to be getting anywhere from 3.3 Mile/kWh at a steady 65 on I95 and 77 degree day to 2.9-3.0 Mile/kWh in mixed daily driving. For comparison Our Model S Plaid shows a 347 Watt/mile or 2.88 Miles/kWh over a six month period but driven under much warmer Summer temperatures. Other than the variance in weather both cars are driven on the same roads and distances.
 

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Driven just 647 miles so far, I seem to be getting anywhere from 3.3 Mile/kWh at a steady 65 on I95 and 77 degree day to 2.9-3.0 Mile/kWh in mixed daily driving. For comparison Our Model S Plaid shows a 347 Watt/mile or 2.88 Miles/kWh over a six month period but driven under much warmer Summer temperatures. Other than the variance in weather both cars are driven on the same roads and distances.
Thanks for this. It seems pretty compatible with @Hydbob’s analysis.
 

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@vetteman It just now occurred to me that nobody has actually answered you. In any EV the displayed range number is an estimate the car computes using past driving history and various other factors. Each OEM has their own formula for calculating remaining range and in truth, it's just a guess to be taken with a hearty dose of salt. It is the remaining capacity and usage per mile that really count.

The number that jumps off your display to me is the 2.0 miles per killowatt hour that your car is showing. That is much higher lower than I would expect for this car in normal use. Everybody's "normal" is different but that is definitely high energy consumption. There are several use cases that could lead to that and there is the possibility of a flaw with the car. If your previous gas car got mileage similarly below its EPA numbers that could be a clue. If not I'm sure Lucid service people could run a diagnostic test to check for a flaw.

Things that drain range:
High speed- wind resistance increases at a hyperbolic rate. This is the #1 range killer for most drivers.
Extended stop and go driving- It can't be avoided but driving smoothly helps.
Climate control- Air conditioning and heating both consume a lot of power. This especially can impact range if the car spends long periods idling or in slow traffic with the climate control set to a very different temperature from outside.
Tires- Low tire pressure or non-stock tires/wheels can have a surprising impact on range, but is unlikely in your case.

If I had 2.0 mi/kwh in this car in my normal 100 degree summer Texas commute with the A/C set at 72 I would assume that something was wrong with the car. If I had the same consumption after zooming my favorite twisty road in, um, Mexico I would think it was just fine.
No Lucid reset the EV Mile/KhW after each charge
 

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I thought I would just attach these pisc and let someone else explain to me what's going on.... I started with a 100% (not 80) full charge. No racing - just daily driver around S CA - The % doesn't equal the miles remaining at all. Based on % iI'll get 209 total miles. Not the 313 shown.
I think you need replace new HV battery Pack.. need to test HV pack for each cell again.. look like hV pack not fully charged.
 
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