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When it comes to charging the Air has a 900V architecture that's compatible with CCS Standard and is capable with any public charging station (except Tesla Superchargers).

Onboard the Air has a Wunderbox boost charger that boosts voltage to make it charge as quick as possible. Lucid claims you can get up to 300 miles of range in 20 minutes Electrify America's DC fast chargers.

While you're on the go the Air's navigation system will help you find the closest charging station and there will be an app for your phone. Lucid also has an interactive map on their website.

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At home, Lucid's home charger will not only charge your Air, it will be able to to reverse the flow of energy from an EV’s batteries. If you ever experience a power outage — for instance — the available Lucid Smart Charger has bi-directional capabilities built-in, enabling you to power your house with your Lucid Air’s battery packs.

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Any word on whether the Home bi-directional charging station would be available at the time of deliveries? I have heard that it might not be. Really interested in the V2G and V2H capabilities. Our little power outage last night in San Diego reinforced my desire to have those capabilities and to use the Lucid as a backup “generator” for the house.
 

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I asked my Delivery Advisor about this on September 21. At that time, she said the wall charger would not be available until at least the end of the year.
End of the year would be fine as there is no way I’ll have my AGT before then. I’m curious about the bidirectional charging capabilities for feeding into the house and the install. Current home charging units that one can purchase today are not capable of bidirectional although a Nissan Leaf is capable. Did your DA give any specifics about the home charger unit?
 

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Did your DA give any specifics about the home charger unit?
I didn't question her about that.

I do know the unit will require a transfer switch, and I don't know if that's already integrated into the wall charger. We already have a transfer switch for our whole-house generator, and I asked our electrician about integrating the wall charger into that system. He said he would have to see the circuit diagrams and installation instructions for the wall charger and probably have to talk with a technical advisor at Lucid about the feasibility of ganging the two back-up systems for the house.

We have a propane tank as there is no piped gas where we live, and in the 9-day outage after Hurricane Irma we drained the propane tank (which was the largest building codes would allow) and had to wait two days for a refill. Using one of our EVs as a backup power source would have been a godsend. My partner was in the end stages of posterior cortical atrophy at that point and could not be evacuated. Two days without water, air conditioning, and elevator availability for a non-ambulatory, incontinent patient was rough going. This notion of bi-directional charging might seem like a marketing gimmick to some. For others it can make a true difference in managing things.
 

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Did you ever consider a solar set up with a battery backup? I nearly went that route but found through unfortunate experience that there are a lot of fly by night and incompetent companies chasing after government subsidy bucks. I finally crunched the numbers and it made more sense at the time to go whole house generator run off propane. But I can’t charge the tesla or lucid for free that a solar set up would provide.
 

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I did an analysis of solar during the house design stage. However, the payback period was decades, during which time the output of the system would have declined. And an array large enough to supply even half our usage would have been quite large. Although Florida calls itself the Sunshine State, it only has a middling rating for total annual sunshine due to the cloud cover during rainy season. Some northern states actually rank higher on the solar index.

That notwithstanding, Florida is building solar farms at the second-highest pace in the nation. Two years ago our power company closed its last coal-powered plant and now generates energy only by solar, nuclear, and natural gas, with solar being the fastest-growing component. Also, our kilowatt hour cost is among the lowest in the nation and has had only one minor increase in eight years. On balance, solar just didn't make sense for us.
 

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Getting our solar put in just in time before delivery of the DE. In Southern California, our solar installation will pay itself off in just under 5 years.

We looked at battery backup options, but decided against it as the base system of 10 kwh would add an extra $14k to the install. We figured with the 100+kwh battery on the DE, it was already worth the price just as a battery backup once Lucid makes V2G available :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

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We have had solar in Dan Diego since 2004 and it has paid for itself nicely. However, they didn’t have back-up batteries back then. We do have a disconnect where we the solar is operational when the grid is down with a couple of plugs so it can act as a generator. But that only works when the sun is out. Otherwise, I have in the past plugged the leaf into an inverter to provide a few outlets at night. Our Leaf has bidirectional capabilities, but there is no EVSE that can pump it into the house which I have seen marketed. I am really looking forward to the Air and the potential to use it to power the house. If I could actually perform energy arbitrage, I could really make the car pay for itself! SDG&E has some huge electric differentials. For the rate plan we are on for EVs, it is $0.093 per kW at night and $0.565 during the peak 4p-9p. At 45 cents per kW in the exchange, i have been told by battery backup installers, that one can only zero out the peak and you are not allowed to do the actual arbitrage. BUT… the CA electricity market is so screwed up, and they are pushing EVERYTHING to run on electricity, it is only going to get worse. At some point the loonies in Sacramento are going to say ”oh sh**, this is not working” and allow us EV owners to push into the grid at peak.

Of course, peak times will change. In 2004 I mused what would happen when everyone got solar? Peak was from 10a-6p, which was sweet For me with solar. Fast forward to today. They have jacked up the power rates so high that everyone (who can) has solar and CA pays other states to take their power during the day. Peak is now in the evening and we are a ‘Ihird world nation state” which wants us to “flex your power since it cannot reliably keep the grid up. In 14 years when ICE cars are outlawed and everyone is charging at night, i imagine peak will be after midnight. I shudder to think what the rates will be….
 

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The average electric rate in Florida is 11.89 cents / kWh. We pay 3 cents extra because we are on a rural electric distribution system that buys its power from a power generation company, and we do not have a peak/off-peak rate structure.

I see no problem in using the Lucid as a back-up power source during an outage. However, I wonder if the added recharge cycles from using the car daily for leveraging peak rates would have any appreciable effect on the battery pack's service life.

Now that engineers have ten years with Teslas under their belts, they have been surprised by seeing less battery degradation than was expected. I've seen some reports that Tesla packs lose about 6% of their charge capacity in the first few years, but the curve flattens significantly after that, and cars in fleet service in Europe that discharge and fully recharge constantly are seeing extraordinary life from their Tesla packs.

I'd really like to know more about Lucid's batteries, in particular the differences between the Samsungs in the Dream Edition and the LG Chems in the rest of the line up. The press releases several years ago mentioned specifically that the proprietary chemistry Lucid co-developed with Samsung was aimed at increasing the ability of the batteries to take fast charging without degradation. No such mention was made about the LG Chem partnership that was announced four years later. Is that because in the ensuing four years LG Chem had made its own progress on this front, or do the Samsung batteries have better resistance to fast charging?
 

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I'm definitely interested in the bidirectional home back up. What would be even better is the rumor that Lucid will have their version of a power wall. This would almost negate the need for the gas generator. It would handle the house when I'm not home. Hopefully, the system is designed well enough to allow connection after the built in is nearly depleted and can be recharged by the car. In theory allow me to go DC fast charge, then return home if the entire metro area isn't down.

That may be a lot to ask.
 

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I'm definitely interested in the bidirectional home back up. What would be even better is the rumor that Lucid will have their version of a power wall. This would almost negate the need for the gas generator. It would handle the house when I'm not home. Hopefully, the system is designed well enough to allow connection after the built in is nearly depleted and can be recharged by the car. In theory allow me to go DC fast charge, then return home if the entire metro area isn't down.

That may be a lot to ask.
My thoughts exactly on the home bidirectional backup. My solar was installed nearly 20 years ago and backup batteries were not an option. Rather than spending the money for a battery add on to my solar, I’m looking for the Lucid to serve that purpose In addition to being a ‘damn good EV’ 😀
 
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