Lucid Motors Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A buddy of mine was in Detroit yesterday to cover the auto show and to his surprise, there were a couple of Lucids on the show floor.
I haven't heard the whole story, since he was obviously busy doing actual work, but he sent me this pic and said he'd seen at least two Lucids in the hall:
Car Land vehicle Tire Vehicle Wheel

I didn't expect Lucid to have a presence at a show like NAIAS because I've heard paying for floor space there is insanely expensive, and I'm guessing the cost here is being shared with Dolby? I'll update this thread if I get more details.
Anybody here planning to see the show?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
A buddy of mine was in Detroit yesterday to cover the auto show and to his surprise, there were a couple of Lucids on the show floor.
I haven't heard the whole story, since he was obviously busy doing actual work, but he sent me this pic and said he'd seen at least two Lucids in the hall: View attachment 1703
I didn't expect Lucid to have a presence at a show like NAIAS because I've heard paying for floor space there is insanely expensive, and I'm guessing the cost here is being shared with Dolby? I'll update this thread if I get more details.
Anybody here planning to see the show?
The reason you don't see Tesla or Lucid vehicles on the main show floor has more to do with the show producer than the cost. Tesla just doesn't do marketing, including auto shows. But the major auto shows are generally presented by the local auto dealer associations, so brands which use a direct sales model need to partner with a show exhibitor such as Dolby. That's the show producer's choice to make, and there's nothing wrong with that. Auto shows are a way to generate floor traffic, which is why dealer trade associations go to the trouble and effort to produce them.
I was an auto dealer for 20 years with 2 dealerships, and I also own a Lucid Air GT. Having been involved in the production of auto shows (the Philadelphia one in my case) I know how much is involved to make one happen.
SO... I think it's fine for dealer associations to decide who gets to exhibit in their shows. BUT I also think that a vehicle manufacturer should be allowed to sell their products to the user in whatever way they choose. This puts me at odds with many of my former colleagues, and IMO they are not wrong when they say manufacturers should not be allowed to compete directly with their franchisees. These folks have invested millions of dollars and their lives, really, into representing their brand. So to the OEMs: pick one and stick with it. And to the dealers: take care of your customers every day and you will remain essential to most people who need a car.

P.S. My recent experience with Tesla service has led me to believe that locally managed independent dealerships are the way to go...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
The reason you don't see Tesla or Lucid vehicles on the main show floor has more to do with the show producer than the cost. Tesla just doesn't do marketing, including auto shows. But the major auto shows are generally presented by the local auto dealer associations, so brands which use a direct sales model need to partner with a show exhibitor such as Dolby. That's the show producer's choice to make, and there's nothing wrong with that. Auto shows are a way to generate floor traffic, which is why dealer trade associations go to the trouble and effort to produce them.
I was an auto dealer for 20 years with 2 dealerships, and I also own a Lucid Air GT. Having been involved in the production of auto shows (the Philadelphia one in my case) I know how much is involved to make one happen.
SO... I think it's fine for dealer associations to decide who gets to exhibit in their shows. BUT I also think that a vehicle manufacturer should be allowed to sell their products to the user in whatever way they choose. This puts me at odds with many of my former colleagues, and IMO they are not wrong when they say manufacturers should not be allowed to compete directly with their franchisees. These folks have invested millions of dollars and their lives, really, into representing their brand. So to the OEMs: pick one and stick with it. And to the dealers: take care of your customers every day and you will remain essential to most people who need a car.

P.S. My recent experience with Tesla service has led me to believe that locally managed independent dealerships are the way to go...
Welcome to the forum @Mike DeSimone! I'm not surprised there's some politics involved when it comes to these auto shows. How have you been enjoying your Lucid so far?
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top