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Where I think the most use can be made of the Plaid's power -- and the Lucid's 1111 hp -- is in quick punches from speed, such as one might do in highway travel. However, that is the very situation in which you're most likely to have the cars set to more relaxed driving modes where the maximum power is not available. So . . . there you go.

We've already lived with a friendly rivalry in our household regarding whether it was more fun to drive the old Model S P90D or the Audi R8 V10 Spyder. With the rivalry now shifting to whether to drive the Plaid or the Lucid Air -- and particularly given the Air's extra 400+ pounds over the Plaid -- I didn't want the Air to feel more laggard than the Plaid, so I decided to sacrifice a bit of range to get the 1111 hp, just so it's there on those vanishingly rare occasions I might ever try to call it up.

It's pointless to the point of stupidity, I know. But sometimes the point of enjoying life is to indulge in pointlessness.
I think this is a driving force behind the more widespread adaption of EVs over the last decade. That was Elons genius with Tesla. Make an EV that was fast and sexy that people could aspire to. Prius have been around forever but being a slow small oddly styled vehicle limited their appeal.
I bought a modelS P85DL back in early 2015 and the guys in my car club laughed at me. That was untill we had our spring runway event and I took down a number of Ferraris and Lambos. I still had trouble with 911 turbo Ss and lightly moddedNissan GTRS however. The model S Raven was even more competitive. People weren’t laughing anymore , many refused to race me.The Tesla was quicker than my modded BMW Z8 so I would take that to the drags. Now several guys have a model S Plaid that early on turned their noses up at such fair. I think the Lucid is just the next step beyond the Tesla, even if it is just a touch slower. The ground work is laid.
 

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Yeah, I was initially upset about the rise of the horseless carriage as well. That Model T had a top speed of 40 mph! Simply an unsafe contraption! shakes fist

Seriously, I’m worried about what the Jersey slide looks like when you have trucks that can do 0 to 60 in 3 sec.

Kinda getting off-topic here. Apologies in advance.
 

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I worry about what the roads will be like when EVs with ridiculous instantaneous acceleration are commonplace.
In a recent podcast, in discussing the Tesla Model S Plaid, Tom Moloughney predicted that its power would sooner or later end up in irresponsible hands that would send the car catapulting into a house.

Unbeknownst to him, it had already happened in Florida. Two hours after being delivered, a Plaid flew off the road at 116 mph and crashed into a house, killing the car's owner (who was in the front passenger seat), a woman in the house, and her dog. The driver and other two passengers in the car were critically injured. (The driver has been charged with double vehicular homicides.)

I strongly suspect the driver lost control due to the rearward weight shift that causes the front wheels to break free suddenly under hard acceleration in this car. After our neighbor unintentionally hit 123 mph when punching our Plaid on an empty, rural public road, we have ceased to let anyone else drive the car. (He was so rattled that he headed straight home after it happened.) We will abide by the same rule when the Air arrives.

We would not own these cars if we had young drivers in the household, and anyone who lets a teenager get anywhere near the drivers' seats is a fool unless the cars have foolproof parental controls that are engaged.

There are going to be enough disasters as these absurdly powerful cars enter more widespread use that pressure is going to build for regulation. I just hope it's in the form of electronic power limiters tied to facial recognition of pre-approved drivers instead of actual limits imposed on the drivetrain design.

Meanwhile, I'll enjoy knowing this power is on tap . . . and almost never actually call it up.
 

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There have been dangerously overpowered cars around since at least the 1960's. There have been incidents of carnage all along. I suppose it is some corollary to that "Power Corrupts" idea.
At least now we have ABS, traction control, etc. so there is some chance of an inexperienced driver regaining control.
 

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Nah you could get a model T to about 45mph. Add a two speed ruckstell rear end or a rago OHV head or a speedster body and you were good into the 50s! ( my first restoration project was a 1926 T depot hack that I started at age 15)
 

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I agree that with proliferation of crazy fast vehicles, more tragedies will come.

The Hellcats have provided some of issues (and Camaros and Mustangs and now the C8 Vettes (Henry Ruggs III).

What is most worrying is that as the extra fast cars depreciate, barriers to accessing them will be reduced.
 

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There have been dangerously overpowered cars around since at least the 1960's. There have been incidents of carnage all along. I suppose it is some corollary to that "Power Corrupts" idea.
At least now we have ABS, traction control, etc. so there is some chance of an inexperienced driver regaining control.
I have had some of those dangerously overpowered ICE cars: a Corvette, a Mercedes SL55 AMG, three Audi R8's (including two V10's), and the prolonged use of a Mercedes McLaren SLR. I've also had some track time with my old boss's small fleet of Ferraris.

I can assure you those cars had acceleration capabilities that lagged well behind the capability of the Tesla Model S Plaid -- or its ability to get out of control before you or the electronic nannies can correct. The Plaid is the only car I've ever driven that actually scares me.
 

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What is most worrying is that as the extra fast cars depreciate, barriers to accessing them will be reduced.
Exactly. The price barrier a Plaid or Lucid Air Dream presents to most buyers will keep the car out of the hands of a lot of wannabe stoplight teen champions.

But the days of sub-3 Tesla Model 3's and Mustang Mach-E's are probably not far off.
 

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Maybe I'm a little ignorant on the subject, weren't most SuperCars until recently sticks? The recent ones paddle shifters? So a certain amount of skill is required to get that type of quick acceleration? In contrast EV, just floor it. Hopefully, low cost EV will prioritize range over performance.
 

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The automated manuals of various flavors have been around a while.

Not sure who was first but Ferrari added their so called F1 tranny in 97 and these days the dual clutch versions are kind of common.

Even with a 3 pedal high power car, you can make a mess of yourself in first or second gear.

A lot of the issues are related to going to fast to react when something appears in the road, getting on the power too hard in a turn and the car breaks loose and there is no room to get it back, just going too fast period (Henry Ruggs III, impairment (Henry Ruggs III), worn tires, wrong tires for the conditions.
 

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Three pedal cars are going the way of the Dodo. Some supercars are not even offered in that flavor. The only reason for a shift years ago was the direct lockup.(no slippage through the tranny) that’s not true anymore plus the shifts are now on the order of milliseconds with a modern automatic) the only reason for a stick is nostalgia and exercising those hard won skills of blipping the throttle on downshifts.
 
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