Lucid Motors Forum banner
41 - 60 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Got my VIN on Nov 2 and delivery Nov 14. Hopefully it's around the same time frame or less!

For now I'm going to leave the caps on. When I wrap and coat the car I will probably have the wheels ceramic coated as well and will most likely remove them at the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Got my VIN on Nov 2 and delivery Nov 14. Hopefully it's around the same time frame or less!

For now I'm going to leave the caps on. When I wrap and coat the car I will probably have the wheels ceramic coated as well and will most likely remove them at the time.
What are you planning to do for a wrap/coat?

I've never put any paint protection on my previous cars, but definitely want to protect my Air once I get it. I've done some research into wrap vs. ceramic and I'm leaning towards STek's DYNOmatt (link). It's got a hydrophobic coating (which I know isn't as good as ceramic), but I think the Zenith Grey would look pretty slick as a matte finish. I am also thinking about STek's DYNOflex windshield film (link) to protect the Glass Canopy, as I'm sure it wouldn't be cheap to replace if it cracks.

Does anyone have any experience with STek's products, or any other thoughts? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Does anyone have any experience with STek's products, or any other thoughts? Thanks.
I don't have any personal experience with STEK, but I liked the reviews I saw so I checked the STEK website for a local installer. I looked at the installer's website which advertised his use of both STEK and Xpel films. When I called him to inquire about applying STEK, he said he had discontinued using it because it was yellowing prematurely in south Florida conditions, and he had had to do too many warranty replacements. He said Xpel did not have this problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
For now I'm going to leave the caps on. When I wrap and coat the car I will probably have the wheels ceramic coated as well and will most likely remove them at the time.
I don't know if you've been following the thread, but "Dreamed" is in correspondence with The New Aero, a Swedish firm that designed an aero wheel specifically for the Tesla line-up. "Dreamed" (who took one of the first Dream deliveries on October 30) is helping The New Aero determine whether its forged wheel for the Model S will fit the Air. (It's looking likely based on factors so far determined.)

Not only is The New Aero wheel one of the best-looking aero wheels I've seen, it is also directional, meaning that the vanes attack the air in the same orientation on both sides of the car, as opposed to the Lucid wheels which reverse attack angles from the opposite sides.

Their website is: thenewaero.com



Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber Automotive design
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
. . . personally I am not a fan of the look.
Yeah, I get it. I don't exactly love any of the aero wheels I've seen. Unfortunately for me, that includes the Dream 21" wheels, so I'm in sort of a "lesser of two evils" mode. I'll be interested to find out whether removing the aero blades on the Dream wheels noticeably impacts range.

My worry is that The New Aero wheels seem to be awfully heavy for a forged wheel (34.5 pounds), so I'm also interested in the weight of the Dream 21" wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Yeah, I get it. I don't exactly love any of the aero wheels I've seen. Unfortunately for me, that includes the Dream 21" wheels, so I'm in sort of a "lesser of two evils" mode. I'll be interested to find out whether removing the aero blades on the Dream wheels noticeably impacts range.

My worry is that The New Aero wheels seem to be awfully heavy for a forged wheel (34.5 pounds), so I'm also interested in the weight of the Dream 21" wheels.
Given all this information, I'm going to take delivery on 19" and wait. Now that painting calipers is now under consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
For folks who have driven the car, is the noise level as much of a negative as the video seems to infer.

Also, under hard acceleration, the driver seems to have do do a lot to keep the car going straight, do folks think it was an issue with the road (at an intersection) or the car not being that easy to keep straight with all that power kicking in.

I looked on the dealership website (for the guy who loaned the car for the video and they are asking $50k over sticker for it. Stealerships in the EV space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Also, under hard acceleration, the driver seems to have do do a lot to keep the car going straight, do folks think it was an issue with the road (at an intersection) or the car not being that easy to keep straight with all that power kicking in.
I think it's an inescapable fact of physics. Our Tesla Model S Plaid goes very light on the front end under hard acceleration, to the point that it's actually dangerous to go too deep into the throttle. Some reviewers have called it torque steer, but it is not. It's the effect of rearward weight transfer under brutal thrust. Shortly after we took delivery in August, Tesla changed the suspension calibration through a software update in an attempt to tame the problem, but it was only marginally successful.

I have quit trying to test just how quickly the Plaid can accelerate because of the sense of pending loss of control. With rear tires 30mm narrower than the Plaid's 295mm's, the Lucid's traction control might kick in a bit sooner than the Tesla's, but I suspect even the 265mm tires will grip enough to trigger dicey levels of rearward weight transfer. There is just so much you can do with suspension design to counter this inescapable effect of physics.

These high-performance EVs put out power well beyond the traction limits of tires and the engineering limits of suspensions. Where the electronic nannies leave off, a driver's common sense has to take over or the car's occupants and surrounding traffic are doomed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
hmp10

Thanks for the candid reply

I completely agree with your point regarding tires

I was big into the idea of the 1111 HP but am quickly coming to see that this would be beyond useful performance and perhaps the Grand Touring would be better for me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Where I think the most use can be made of the Plaid's power -- and the Lucid's 1111 hp -- is in quick punches from speed, such as one might do in highway travel. However, that is the very situation in which you're most likely to have the cars set to more relaxed driving modes where the maximum power is not available. So . . . there you go.

We've already lived with a friendly rivalry in our household regarding whether it was more fun to drive the old Model S P90D or the Audi R8 V10 Spyder. With the rivalry now shifting to whether to drive the Plaid or the Lucid Air -- and particularly given the Air's extra 400+ pounds over the Plaid -- I didn't want the Air to feel more laggard than the Plaid, so I decided to sacrifice a bit of range to get the 1111 hp, just so it's there on those vanishingly rare occasions I might ever try to call it up.

It's pointless to the point of stupidity, I know. But sometimes the point of enjoying life is to indulge in pointlessness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I am with you

I have a Gen 2 NSX and getting the 1111 HP version of the Air is just because I can have it

With the NSX the engineers built the car to not kill you if the nannies are on

You can punch it from 0 or at speed and have fun without going into a ditch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #59 ·
I'm not sure about the reviewer, but I've "launched" it 3 times so far and I didn't have any issue with keeping it under control. I did not have any "torque steer" or weird issues like the guy did. It's possible it was the road conditions? But it's pretty irresponsible to launch from that stoplight or intersection anyways.
 
41 - 60 of 77 Posts
Top