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There were 2 blemishes in the finish, 1 was on the aluminum finish for the top of the car and another was on the rear spoiler.
Did you get the impression the car left the factory with these blemishes or might they have occurred in transit? And how long do you think it will be before Lucid tackles them? Is there any chance they would resolve with a light polishing? (I ask the last two questions because I want to get my car Opti-Coated before putting it on the road, and I would hate to have to hold off until paint blemishes were corrected by Lucid.)


At the time, the car was at 83% SOC so take the charge speed as you will.
Did Lucid make any recommendations about where to set the upper charge limit for daily use instead of when beginning a long trip?


Sprint, obviously, gives the best throttle response, acceleration, and the stiffest suspension. I wish I could drive in that mode all the time, however, the heat pump which is activated to draw heat from the batteries is quite loud and would get tiring after a while, though, I would never foresee myself driving in sprint mode for any sort of distance driving.
Was the heat pump running only during or immediately after aggressive driving, or does it run the whole time the car is in Sprint mode? Do you have any idea whether leaving the car in Sprint mode will drain the battery faster than the other two modes when driven equally sedately? (I keep our Tesla in "Plaid" mode all the time just to have access to power for a quick punch when traffic conditions allow, but spend the vast majority of my time driving with traffic flow. I'm wondering if it's practical to do the same with the Air.)
 

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Thanks for taking the time to answer so many questions, Hydbob. Your understanding of the features and your ability to analyze what's going on with the car is very helpful to those of us trying to get as far up the learning curve as we can before our cars arrive.
 

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2) The UI takes some time to boot up entering the car. Once you open the door and get in, you can drive within about 5 seconds but the UI will not have finished loading yet so no cameras, no hold assist, no parking sensors, nothing computer related will be working yet until it finishes loading.
This happened sometimes in our 2015 Tesla from the time we bought it and still happened after the MCU was replaced with a newer unit. To my surprise, it still happens sometimes in our new Model S Plaid, leaving us sitting sometimes for 30 seconds or more while the systems come up. Sometimes when we put the car in gear, a message comes up that driver assist and accident avoidance features are not available. Once we get that message, it stays on until we exit the car. When we get back in the car on days it's doing that, sometimes the message will have disappeared, and sometimes it doesn't. This has been happening with our Teslas for six years and was not fixed with the updated 2022 models.


6) Setting up a dashcam right now is proving to be an interesting puzzle considering the 12v plug is in the trunk.
Are you sure the Lucid cameras don't serve as a dashcam? Our Model S Plaid came with a USB stick plugged into the glovebox that records forward-facing camera footage on a continuous basis. When full, the stick starts recording over previous footage, but you can hit a save button that permanently saves the ten preceding minutes.


7) Phone key and key fob work well. Car will automatically start up and unlock about 10 feet away and will also lock automatically when you get about 10 feet away.
Our Model S Plaid has three ways to operate the car: card, phone key, and key fob. The last two are programmed by placing the card on the phone charger pad. However, it's all hit and miss. We both have our phones and key fobs programmed to operate the car. I prefer using the key fob, and about a third of the time it won't start the car. And the car won't default to my keyed phone, which I'm also carrying. I know the car is reading the fob or the phone, as the doors unlock and the handles extend as I approach, and the charging cable releases. But then I get into the car and get a message that the card is required to start the car, so I have to dig it out of my wallet and rub it over the phone charger pad. The car will go several days without the problem, and then there'll be a day running errands when I have to go through this crap every time I get into the car. It really makes me miss the old "key in the ignition" days.

I hope Lucid can do a better job than Tesla -- which bills itself as a "software company at heart" -- of rooting these kind of bugs out of their software systems.


10) I am able to fit a set of 7 year old twins into the frunk with no issue.
Do you think they'll still fit when they're 15 and you're really gonna want this feature?
 

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One thing my Tesla experience has taught me is not to let my expectations about software features run away. It was a lesson I learned early on with Apple computers and their over-hyped but always under-performing promises of connectivity between equipment.

I fully expect my Lucid to arrive with many features not yet activated and some that will exhibit perpetual faulty performance. Ultimately, my measure of Lucid on this score will not be against perfection, but against how well other carmakers pull off similar features.

95% of the praise Tesla gets for its vaunted software excellence comes from people who obviously don't own a Tesla.

For me, a car is a driving machine first and always . . . and only incidentally a rolling computer. And it is the driving machine I am buying and on which I place my greatest expectations.
 

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I finalized my order on Monday.
Can you tell us when you initially reserved the car? Have there been some cancellations that are opening up further slots for Dream orders?

I finalized my order on September 20 and still don't have a production date, but a friend who finalized three days after me (and reserved 15 months after me) is getting his car tomorrow. Choosing Zenith Red seems to move you to the back of the production queue, although Lucid refuses to confirm that.
 

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I opted for a white P if that changes the delivery time.
Some white Dreams have already been delivered, so I doubt that will hold you up. Lucid will only say the place in production queue is a function of "several factors", but they won't say what those factors are. As near as I can tell, color is the only factor. My friend and I are both in Florida, both ordered the Performance version, and both ordered the same wheels. As there are no other options, color remains the only variable that seems to trump reservation or configuration order. And as all Dream colors but the Zenith Red are already being delivered, only red seems to be a cause of delay.

Lucid is maintaining that all Dreams will be delivered by year end. With only a 6-week window left, I'm pretty sure you'll see your car before I see mine.
 

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Does anyone have any experience with STek's products, or any other thoughts? Thanks.
I don't have any personal experience with STEK, but I liked the reviews I saw so I checked the STEK website for a local installer. I looked at the installer's website which advertised his use of both STEK and Xpel films. When I called him to inquire about applying STEK, he said he had discontinued using it because it was yellowing prematurely in south Florida conditions, and he had had to do too many warranty replacements. He said Xpel did not have this problem.
 

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For now I'm going to leave the caps on. When I wrap and coat the car I will probably have the wheels ceramic coated as well and will most likely remove them at the time.
I don't know if you've been following the thread, but "Dreamed" is in correspondence with The New Aero, a Swedish firm that designed an aero wheel specifically for the Tesla line-up. "Dreamed" (who took one of the first Dream deliveries on October 30) is helping The New Aero determine whether its forged wheel for the Model S will fit the Air. (It's looking likely based on factors so far determined.)

Not only is The New Aero wheel one of the best-looking aero wheels I've seen, it is also directional, meaning that the vanes attack the air in the same orientation on both sides of the car, as opposed to the Lucid wheels which reverse attack angles from the opposite sides.

Their website is: thenewaero.com



Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber Automotive design
 

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. . . personally I am not a fan of the look.
Yeah, I get it. I don't exactly love any of the aero wheels I've seen. Unfortunately for me, that includes the Dream 21" wheels, so I'm in sort of a "lesser of two evils" mode. I'll be interested to find out whether removing the aero blades on the Dream wheels noticeably impacts range.

My worry is that The New Aero wheels seem to be awfully heavy for a forged wheel (34.5 pounds), so I'm also interested in the weight of the Dream 21" wheels.
 

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I watched most of this and posted a new thread on the other forum. Seemed very impressive.
Well, until you read the comments section where he said that the Air left him wanting more and that Lucid's best move would be to let a more experienced automaker build the car using the Lucid drivetrain.
 

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Also, under hard acceleration, the driver seems to have do do a lot to keep the car going straight, do folks think it was an issue with the road (at an intersection) or the car not being that easy to keep straight with all that power kicking in.
I think it's an inescapable fact of physics. Our Tesla Model S Plaid goes very light on the front end under hard acceleration, to the point that it's actually dangerous to go too deep into the throttle. Some reviewers have called it torque steer, but it is not. It's the effect of rearward weight transfer under brutal thrust. Shortly after we took delivery in August, Tesla changed the suspension calibration through a software update in an attempt to tame the problem, but it was only marginally successful.

I have quit trying to test just how quickly the Plaid can accelerate because of the sense of pending loss of control. With rear tires 30mm narrower than the Plaid's 295mm's, the Lucid's traction control might kick in a bit sooner than the Tesla's, but I suspect even the 265mm tires will grip enough to trigger dicey levels of rearward weight transfer. There is just so much you can do with suspension design to counter this inescapable effect of physics.

These high-performance EVs put out power well beyond the traction limits of tires and the engineering limits of suspensions. Where the electronic nannies leave off, a driver's common sense has to take over or the car's occupants and surrounding traffic are doomed.
 

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Where I think the most use can be made of the Plaid's power -- and the Lucid's 1111 hp -- is in quick punches from speed, such as one might do in highway travel. However, that is the very situation in which you're most likely to have the cars set to more relaxed driving modes where the maximum power is not available. So . . . there you go.

We've already lived with a friendly rivalry in our household regarding whether it was more fun to drive the old Model S P90D or the Audi R8 V10 Spyder. With the rivalry now shifting to whether to drive the Plaid or the Lucid Air -- and particularly given the Air's extra 400+ pounds over the Plaid -- I didn't want the Air to feel more laggard than the Plaid, so I decided to sacrifice a bit of range to get the 1111 hp, just so it's there on those vanishingly rare occasions I might ever try to call it up.

It's pointless to the point of stupidity, I know. But sometimes the point of enjoying life is to indulge in pointlessness.
 

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I worry about what the roads will be like when EVs with ridiculous instantaneous acceleration are commonplace.
In a recent podcast, in discussing the Tesla Model S Plaid, Tom Moloughney predicted that its power would sooner or later end up in irresponsible hands that would send the car catapulting into a house.

Unbeknownst to him, it had already happened in Florida. Two hours after being delivered, a Plaid flew off the road at 116 mph and crashed into a house, killing the car's owner (who was in the front passenger seat), a woman in the house, and her dog. The driver and other two passengers in the car were critically injured. (The driver has been charged with double vehicular homicides.)

I strongly suspect the driver lost control due to the rearward weight shift that causes the front wheels to break free suddenly under hard acceleration in this car. After our neighbor unintentionally hit 123 mph when punching our Plaid on an empty, rural public road, we have ceased to let anyone else drive the car. (He was so rattled that he headed straight home after it happened.) We will abide by the same rule when the Air arrives.

We would not own these cars if we had young drivers in the household, and anyone who lets a teenager get anywhere near the drivers' seats is a fool unless the cars have foolproof parental controls that are engaged.

There are going to be enough disasters as these absurdly powerful cars enter more widespread use that pressure is going to build for regulation. I just hope it's in the form of electronic power limiters tied to facial recognition of pre-approved drivers instead of actual limits imposed on the drivetrain design.

Meanwhile, I'll enjoy knowing this power is on tap . . . and almost never actually call it up.
 

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There have been dangerously overpowered cars around since at least the 1960's. There have been incidents of carnage all along. I suppose it is some corollary to that "Power Corrupts" idea.
At least now we have ABS, traction control, etc. so there is some chance of an inexperienced driver regaining control.
I have had some of those dangerously overpowered ICE cars: a Corvette, a Mercedes SL55 AMG, three Audi R8's (including two V10's), and the prolonged use of a Mercedes McLaren SLR. I've also had some track time with my old boss's small fleet of Ferraris.

I can assure you those cars had acceleration capabilities that lagged well behind the capability of the Tesla Model S Plaid -- or its ability to get out of control before you or the electronic nannies can correct. The Plaid is the only car I've ever driven that actually scares me.
 

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What is most worrying is that as the extra fast cars depreciate, barriers to accessing them will be reduced.
Exactly. The price barrier a Plaid or Lucid Air Dream presents to most buyers will keep the car out of the hands of a lot of wannabe stoplight teen champions.

But the days of sub-3 Tesla Model 3's and Mustang Mach-E's are probably not far off.
 
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